Crambe Repetita #122

Welcome to a (mostly daily) newsletter of recommendations from Todd L. Burns. In every email, I suggest some things that I find interesting. Maybe you will too…

Special Magic Edition!

Listen

Foxygen - Shuggie

A highlight from We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace & Magic.

Read

Secrets of the Magus

This New Yorker profile is maybe one of the best things I’ve ever read in the magazine, which is saying a lot!

Ricky Jay does closeup magic that flouts reality. But, rather than headline in Las Vegas, Jay prefers to live in the mysterious world of ancient mountebanks, eccentric entertainers, and sleight-of-hand artists, whose secrets he preserves with a scholarly passion, and who are his true peers in the realm of illusion.

Watch

The Amazing Johnathan Documentary

Ostensibly following a magician as he returns to the stage for a farewell tour, this documentary just gets weirder and weirder as it goes along. I genuinely laughed out loud at the audacity of the final twist in this incredibly twisty film.

Crambe Repetita #121

Welcome to a (mostly daily) newsletter of recommendations from Todd L. Burns. In every email, I suggest some things that I find interesting. Maybe you will too…

Special Bobby Caldwell Edition!

Listen

Bobby Caldwell - What You Won't Do for Love

This was the first dance at my wedding. It was tough to find a song that I liked an incredible amount, wasn’t cliche, and had lyrics that met the moment. But this one did all of it.

Read

The White Lie That Broke Bobby Caldwell on Black Radio

Oddly enough, I hadn’t really thought about this article on RBMA Daily we had published before our wedding. But it’s one of the more fascinating tales that I ever got pitched.

Old myths have a way of sticking around. Especially the one about Bobby Caldwell being black. It’s been [more than three decades] since Caldwell broke through with the soul classic “What You Won’t Do For Love,” and yet, some are still shocked when they find out the singer is white.

Look

Bobby Caldwell looking pretty suave

See something you’ll know a friend will like? Please feel free to share it!

Crambe Repetita #120

Welcome to a (mostly daily) newsletter of recommendations from Todd L. Burns. In every email, I suggest some things that I find interesting. Maybe you will too…

Listen

Altered Images - Think That It Might

Wish I had a summer-vacation-at-the-lake montage video to watch while this was playing. (I’m thinking a slow motion wave, created by a jet ski, for some reason?)

Read

Roots Music Becomes a Major Player in Video Games

Fascinating to see the level of care put into Red Dead Redemption and other games like it. (Easier when you got the money, surely, but impressive nonetheless.)

If you look closely… you’ll see their fingers actually tracking the music, so it looks like they’re really playing. This blew me away when I first saw it, never having imagined that a game studio would use motion capture technology on folk musicians playing banjo, fiddle, concertina, and other folk instruments. Smith confirmed that the studio filmed him and others while recording to get the fingerings right, and he and others donned motion capture suits for specific scenes as well.

Look

One of the final photographs taken of Joseph Beuys

He was so photogenic, you couldn’t really take an uninteresting picture of him.

Crambe Repetita #119

Welcome to a (mostly daily) newsletter of recommendations from Todd L. Burns. In every email, I suggest some things that I find interesting. Maybe you will too…

Listen

Growing Bin Jazz Funk

The outrageously good record store posts outrageously good jazz funk tunes on YouTube.

Read

What Should an Artist Save?

An excellent look at how some visual artists are approaching their legacies. (h/t: AG)

Look

Redefining the Power series by Kiluanji Kia Henda

This Angolan artist uses monuments and pedestals as a platform to talk about colonialism, power, and hope. They’re stunning photographs.

Crambe Repetita #118

Welcome to a newsletter of recommendations from Todd L. Burns. In every email, I suggest some things that I find interesting. Maybe you will too…

Listen

Sophie And Peter Johnston - Torn Open

Japanese City Pop, except in English. What a glorious ray of sunshine. (H/T: ST and JP!)

Read

Elizabeth Warren as a Teacher

A really great explanation of how Warren teaches using the Socratic method (and how that informs her worldview).

Chrystin Ondersma was a second-year transfer student at Harvard Law School… and hoped to study with the civil-rights theorist Lani Guinier, who… had levied a critique of how law-school classes were taught. Guinier particularly took issue with the Socratic method — whereby professors cold-called students in large lecture halls, asking them to cough up information about case law in front of their peers — as being fundamentally unfriendly to the least-privileged students in a classroom.

Ondersma agreed with Guinier about the limitations of the Socratic method, and when, during her first semester at Harvard, she saw a notice about a lunchtime lecture on the Socratic method offered by Elizabeth Warren, a professor she’d never heard of, she decided she’d go and argue her case. By phone, Ondersma remembered how, in a small conference room packed with students, Warren had laid out a case “for how, if you really care about equality in the classroom, if you care about racial justice, gender justice, and you just rely on voluntary discussion in classrooms, you’re only going to hear from the two white guys that love to talk.” For Warren, the Socratic method did not further inequities; it was a tool to mitigate them.

Warren reiterates this argument today, suggesting that “what Lani was criticizing was the Socratic method done really badly.” She said to me, “The reason I never took volunteers is when you take volunteers, you’re going to hear mostly from men. ’Cause they have a lot more confidence, and they’ll get those hands up.”

Look

Norman Rockwell takes on NASA

Anyone know of any great profiles or books about Norman Rockwell? This painting is yet another example, to me, of Rockwell having some sort of hidden and interesting side to him.

Loading more posts…